Is marriage and relationship education before marriage necessity or luxury

SHARE THIS POST

Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on print
Share on email

How can I prepper for a successful relationship

Rates of divorce have increased dramatically, with estimates that about 40 to 45% of Australian marriages will end in divorce. The first year of marriage is still the most challenging, with more than 30% of couples divorcing within ten years of marriage. Rates of relationship separation of cohabiting couples are hard to estimate but are higher than for married couples.

Research has shown that couples who are not able to handle conflicts and negotiate the transitions in a couple’s life together are at increased risk for relationship distress and separation. Associated with a range of complex social changes is a transformation like a role in relationships. In the past, couple relationships had clear gender roles and definitions of power (the so-called “traditional marriage”), now there are more gender role flexible and egalitarian relationships. Not surprisingly, these changes can generate conflict. For example, there may be differences over issues such as whose career is more important, who will be the predominant caregiver for the children, or whose opinion will prevail regarding family money matters. Partners who feel their relationship does not meet their expectations often feel severely dissatisfied.

Rates of divorce have increased dramatically, with estimates that about 40 to 45% of Australian marriages will end in divorce.

While not universally endorsed, the majority of young adults have expectations of their spouses, which include sexual monogamy, honesty, expressions of affection, emotional intimacy and support.

The overwhelming majority of people who separate from relationships become involved in subsequent relationships, either by marrying or cohabiting with a new partner. Rates of remarriage after divorce have decreased, particularly for women.

Besides, separation and divorce respond with substantial financial losses for both partners. The costs associated with divorce, including social security payments and court proceedings, run close to a staggering 3 billion dollars a year in Australia alone.

Which are the benefits of strong relationships for partners

Mutually satisfying marriage is good for the physical health of adults. Relative to never-married or divorced people, married people, and in particular people in a mutually satisfying marriage, live longer and have lower rates of many diseases and illnesses. Moreover, married adults who do develop health problems tend to recover faster, and more effectively from many illness than other adults. A mutually satisfying long-term couple relationship is associated with greater resilience to the negative effects of life stresses, and reduced rates of psychological disorder.

The majority of children who experience parental divorce live with their mothers (80%), and about half of these children will have a step-father living with them within six years of the divorce.

There are several mechanisms by which being happily married may impact physical health. Couple relationships can have effects on health mediated through health-related behaviours. For example, happily married partners tend to lead healthier lifestyles, (e.g., do not smoke tobacco, drink less alcohol, exercise more) than other adults. Moreover, happily married partners make greater use of health promotion and early detection of disease services and take more active roles in the management of their illnesses than other adults.

Besides, marriage has a major impact on the financial well-being of partners. Being in a mutually satisfying marriage is associated with less time away from work and greater career achievement.

What are the negative consequences of relationships breakdown

The unhappy marriages may have direct harmful physical effects that harm health. For example, relationship conflict causes suppression of the immune system, which increases the risk of major health problems.

Relationship problems and separation are very stressful life events, often associated with substantial adjustment problems. Marital distress is associated with higher rates of many forms of individual maladjustment, including substance abuse, depression, bipolar disorder and anxiety. Marital problems often precede the onset of individual problems like excessive drinking and depression. Moreover, marital problems predict much poorer prognosis for people receiving treatment for a range of psychological disorders.

The costs associated with divorce, including mortgage payments and court proceedings, run close to a staggering 3 billion dollars a year in Australia

Distressed couples tend to reciprocate on a “quid pro quo” basis the behaviours of their spouse. In other words, partners tend only to be positive if their partner recently has been positive, and if one partner behaves negatively, the others often respond negatively immediately.

What are the reasons for Marriage Breakdown​

Some of the most frequently cited marital problems involve:

communication difficulties and loss of trustgeneral incompatibilityinfidelityloss of intimacysexual difficultiesnot spending enough time at homedisagreements over moneycontrolling or abusive behaviour

If you’re experiencing difficulties in any of the areas listed above, you’re not alone. When problems arise in these areas, couples often seek help. Rest assured that all of these concerns may be addressed and resolved with effective relationship counselling.

Impact of strong relationships and marriage on children

The majority of children who experience parental divorce live with their mothers (80%), and about half of these children will have a step-father living with them within six years of the divorce. Rates of the break-up of stepfamilies are particularly high, which exposes many children to two or more separations of their parents with partners.

While not universally endorsed, the majority of young adults have expectations of their spouses, which include sexual monogamy, honesty, expressions of affection, emotional intimacy and support.

Growing up in a home with two stable and happy parents is one of the strongest protective factors for children against a wide variety of mental, physical, educational, and peer-related problems. In contrast, parental conflict, distress and divorce are risk factors for a range of poor child outcomes, including depression, withdrawal, conduct disorder, poor social competence, health problems, and academic underachievement. The negative effects of parental relationship problems and divorce impact upon offspring long term. Adult offspring of divorce have substantially higher rates of psychological disorder, and are much more likely themselves to divorce, than the rest of the population.

High levels of inter-parental conflict constitute a major risk factor for poor mental health both for the parents and for the children involved. A parental conflict that is more overt, frequent and intense predicts externalising as well as internalising problems, including conduct-related problems, social incompetence, depression, health problems, and poor school performance. Marital conflict also is associated with parents having more negative and less effective parenting strategies.

How can Awakening relationship counselling help you

Your counsellor or life coach will form a collaborative alliance with you. Together, you will identify key areas for change and learn practical tools to help you and your partner create a mutually beneficial, rewarding relationship.

Acting now and entering into a counselling or life coaching situation might very well be a giant leap out of your comfort zone, but as many before you, you may never look back.

“You know you’re in love when you can’t fall asleep because reality is finally better than your dreams.”

– Awakening Melbourne

SHARE THIS POST

Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on print
Share on email